I give such good advice.

I gave some really good advice today, guys. I told a co-worker that the best way to rid yourself of a fear of public speaking is to do something horribly mortifying just before you’re set to speak. That way, public speaking is a breeze!

Years ago, I got a job working at a furniture store. It was mundane office work which has always been my jam, so I was pumped. I still remember what I was wearing on that first day (my brownish/gray wide-legged dress pants and a V-neck pink shirt with 3/4 sleeves. Hot.), and even how I styled my hair (make-do French twist with a butterfly clip, of course).

Early in the day, before I’d met anyone but the office staff, I was leaning backwards in my chair to say something to a co-worker across the office… when suddenly, my chair tipped back just a bit too far. You know the feeling: ice in your veins, heart skips a beat, death is imminent. Life flashing before my eyes, in typical Kat fashion, I completely spaz out – pinwheel my arms, kick up my feet, half scream. Looking back on this 10+ years later, I firmly believe that if I were a more graceful kind of person, I would’ve recovered and the office staff would have had a nice, quiet, office-appropriate chuckle. However, my middle name is Michelle and not Grace, so my spasticity was my demise and caused my entire chair not just to flip over backwards/sideways… no, but also put so much inertia behind the chair that when it fell, it ejected me. I rolled and rolled until the top third of my body was in the adjacent break room.

Did I mention there was a morning sales meeting going on in the adjacent break room? So the adjacent break room was full of salespeople I had yet to meet. Oh, I didn’t mention it? Well, there was a morning sales meeting going on in the adjacent break room, so the adjacent break room was full of salespeople I had yet to meet. The woman (whose name I can’t even remember now) running the meeting giggled once but everyone else stared at me in complete stunned silence.

I picked myself up, looked at them, and said the only thing running through my mind.

“Hi. I’m the new girl.”

From that day forward, nothing about that job ever stressed me out. An angry customer? Please. I flipped my chair over on my first day. Snobby co-worker? C’mon. The first thing a dozen salespeople saw of me was the top of my head as it came barreling through the break room doorway.

So, you see, this was advice I gave was very sincere and I meant every word of it.

“Every star is a sun as big, as bright, as our own…”



Every star is a sun as big, as bright, as our own. Just imagine, how far away from us you’d have to move the sun to make it appear as small and faint as a star. The light from the stars travels very fast. Faster than anything. But not infinitely fast. It takes time for their light to reach us. For the nearest ones, it takes years. For others, centuries. Some stars are so far away it takes eons for their light to get to Earth.

By the time the light from some stars gets here they are already dead. For those stars, we see only their ghosts. We see their light, but their bodies perished long, long ago.

– Episode 5: A Sky Full Of Ghosts, Cosmos: A SpaceTime Odyssey

“What beauty. I saw clouds and their light shadows on the distant dear earth…”

What beauty. I saw clouds and their light shadows on the distant dear earth…. The water looked like darkish, slightly gleaming spots…. When I watched the horizon, I saw the abrupt, contrasting transition from the earth’s light-colored surface to the absolutely black sky. I enjoyed the rich color spectrum of the earth. It is surrounded by a light blue aureole that gradually darkens, becoming turquiose, dark blue, violet, and finally coal black.

Yuri Gagarin, The first human in Space.  (via wordsnquotes)